EconomyMarkets

Singapore to allow Boeing 737 MAX to return to service By Reuters

© Reuters. Two workers walk under the wing of a 737 Max aircraft at the Boeing factory in Renton, Washington, U.S., March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson/Files

(Reuters) – Singapore’s aviation regulator said on Monday it would approve the return to service of the Boeing (NYSE:) Co 737 MAX more than two years after the plane was grounded, becoming the latest country in the Asia Pacific region to do so.

The approval is based on operators including Singapore Airlines (OTC:) Ltd complying with airworthiness directives and additional flight crew training requirements, the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) said in a statement.

Singapore grounded the 737 MAX in March 2019 following two fatal crashes. The approval for its return comes months after the model returned to service in the United States and Europe, and follows more recent lifting of grounding orders https://www.reuters.com/world/india/india-allows-boeing-737-max-planes-fly-ending-an-over-2-year-ban-2021-08-26/#:~:text=NEW%20DELHI%2C%20Aug%2026%20(Reuters,travel%20market%20for%20the%20planemaker.&text=It%20has%20more%20than%20100%20of%20the%20planes%20on%20order in other countries, including Australia, Fiji, Japan, India and Malaysia.

China is the biggest market in the region that has yet to approve the return of the 737 MAX, though Boeing last month conducted test flights in the country.

Singapore Airlines has six of the planes and it plans to take delivery of another eight in the financial year ending March 31, 2022, the carrier said in a presentation in May.

Singapore Airlines said on Monday it would continue to work closely with CAAS and other relevant regulators in the coming weeks to meet the requirements to return its 737 MAX planes to service. Further details on its 737 MAX operations will be announced at a later date, the airline added.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.


Source link

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button